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WorkSafeBC

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Injury Prevention Resources for Construction - General Construction

General Construction | Hazardous Materials | Heavy Construction | Road Construction

Concrete & Masonry | Cranes | Demolition | Electrical | Fall Protection | Hearing Protection | Mobile Equipment | Personal Protective Equipment | Residential | Roofing | Scaffolding | Site Preparation & Excavation | General

The following links list tools, publications, and other resources to help prevent the most common injuries and illnesses in the construction industry. These resources may not meet all the requirements for health and safety in British Columbia. Please check the Workers Compensation Act, the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation, and related materials for specific WorkSafeBC requirements.

Concrete & Masonry


Concrete pump hose whips, throwing worker accident investigation slide show (2 min 41 sec)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Safe Work Practices for Concrete Pump Operations a WorkSafe bulletin (PDF 63 KB)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Industry Standard - Concrete Cutting & Drilling (PDF 4 MB)
"Industry standard in the construction industry."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia

Industry Standard - Concrete Pumping (PDF 740 KB)
"This industry standard provides practical advice about the safe operation, maintenance and disposal of concrete pumping equipment. The emphasis is on ensuring a safe working environment whenever this equipment is used. It is not intended to be an all-encompassing design, maintenance and operation manual."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia

Cranes


A bright arc: A video guide to powerline safety (video)

video  thumbnail This seven part video deals with the dangers of working near overhead and underground powerlines. Dramatic footage and computer animation show what can happen if you or someone on your job site accidentally contacts an energized powerline. (12 min 52 s)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Crane operator certification

Attention All Operators of Mobile Cranes, Tower Cranes, Self-Erect Cranes, and Boom Trucks
Critical Deadline - February 28th, 2011

Crane operators must have a valid operator's certificate by February 28, 2011. WorkSafe Bulletin WS 2010-06.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* HTML

Crane operator certification
In accordance with WorkSafeBC's Occupational Health and Safety Regulation, all operators of cranes in British Columbia are required to have a valid operator's certificate. (Dated: March 2009)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* PDF (22 KB)


Competency & training

Crane competency profile chartsspace
The following competency profile charts have been designed to assist you and your company to meet the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation section 14.34.1 Operator certification.

Tower Crane Operator (PDF 148 KB)
Mobile Crane Operator (PDF 188 KB)
Boom Truck Operator (PDF 192 KB)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC and BCACS (BC Association for Crane Safety)

How to hire a safety training provider space
This article breaks down the process of hiring a safety training provider into three easy steps. From Worksafe Magazine, January/February 2007 edition.
* PDF (154 KB)

Tower crane inspection checklistsspace
The following inspection checklists have been designed to assist you and your company to meet the requirements of WorkSafeBC regulations for inspecting your cranes.

Climbing Frame Inspection (PDF 57 KB)
Construction Site Tower Crane Report (PDF 54 KB)
Luffing Tower Crane (PDF 101 KB)
Self Erecting Tower Crane (PDF 97KB)
Standard Tower Crane (PDF 96 KB)
Weekly and Monthly Tower Crane Inspection (PDF 79 KB)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC


Resources

Resource material for current crane operators
The following list of resource material was developed to assist current operators who will be required to complete a practical assessment starting January 2008.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* PDF (17 KB)

Inspection of Crane Hooks WorkSafe Bulletin 05-04space
The load hook assembly on cranes should be disassembled and inspected periodically for wear, corrosion, and other damage. In a near miss recently, a crane dropped its load when the hook assembly failed as a result of corrosion and excessive wear on the threads of the hook and nut.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Occupational Health and Safety Guideline
G20.13(3.1) Ensuring loads do not exceed capacity of thrust-out platforms
Issued June 14, 2004; Revised May 17, 2006
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Articulating Boom Crane Hazard WorkSafe Bulletin 02-01(PDF 156 KB) space
A WorkSafe Bulletin
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Preventing Electrocutions of Crane Operators and Crew Members Working Near Overhead Power Lines space
Workers are killed each year when cranes contact overhead power lines. This [NIOSH] Alert describes five cases (six electrocutions) that resulted from such hazards and makes recommendations for preventing similar incidents.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Crane or Derrick Suspended Personal Platforms space
"This booklet discusses OSHA's requirements for hoisting personnel by crane or derrick in the construction industry, prescribes the measures employers must take to bring their workplaces into compliance, and describes safe work practices for employees."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Crane, Derrick, and Hoist Safety space
A Safety and Health Topic page.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Demolition


imageAsbestos: be aware enforcement initiative
From March 17 to December 31, 2014, WorkSafeBC prevention officers will conduct planned inspections of single-family demolition worksites to ensure homeowners, prime contractors, hazardous material survey contractors, asbestos abatement contractors, and consultants are informed and equipped to safely remove asbestos containing materials and are complying with the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. More information on the initiative.


The dangers of breathing silica dust WorkSafe Bulletin 2009-04
This WorkSafe bulletin defines silica, silicosis, and how employers and workers can protect themselves from exposure to silica dust.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Renovation and Restoration Projects WorkSafe Bulletin 05-06 (PDF 85 KB)
This WorkSafe bulletin describes what's required of you and your contractor before you start your renovation or restoration projects.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Asbestos Hazards in Demolition, Renovation and Salvage WorkSafe Bulletin 03-03 (PDF 726 KB) space
This WorkSafe bulletin describes the safe methods of handling asbestos-containing material (ACM), procedures for demolition, renovation, or salvage of buildings or structures, and the responsibilities of employer or owner/builder.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Revised March 2014

Also available in the following languages:

An Evaluation of Glove Bag Containment in Asbestos Removal (PDF 3 MB) space
This report examines the effectiveness of the glove bag control method to prevent asbestos emissions during the removal of asbestos-containing pipe lagging.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

OSHA Asbestos Advisor 2.0 space
"The Asbestos Advisor is an interactive compliance assistance tool. Once installed on your PC, it can interview you about buildings and worksites, and the kinds of tasks workers perform there. It will produce guidance on how the Asbestos standard may apply to those buildings and that work. Its guidance depends on your answers. It can provide general guidance and may, also, be focused on a particular project. It provides pop-up definitions through 'hypertext'."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Technical Links: Asbestos space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Safe Work Practices for Handling Asbestos (PDF 7.5 MB) spaceupdated
This booklet describes the safe methods of handling all types of asbestos-containing materials. It discusses suitable work procedures for the removal, enclosure, and encapsulation of friable asbestos materials.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store
* A free ebook version for iPad is available on iTunes
Updated: December 2012

OSHA Topic: Demolition space
A Safety and Health Topic page.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Children of Construction Workers at Increased Risk for Lead Poisoning space
"In the first comprehensive study of home lead contamination among construction workers, researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health found that children of lead-exposed construction workers were six times more likely to have blood lead levels over the recommended limit than children whose parents did not work in lead-related industries."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Lead: Preventing exposure at work (PDF 515 KB) space
This booklet explains lead exposure, its health effects, and ways to prevent it.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Lead-Containing Paints and Coatings: Preventing exposure in the construction industry (PDF 1.1 MB) space
This manual is for employers, supervisors, and workers who may come into contact with lead-containing paints and coatings in the construction industry. It provides information about lead and assists employers in developing an exposure control plan and suitable safe work procedures.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Controlling Lead Exposures in the Construction Industry: Engineering and work practice controls space
"This chapter [Section V, Chapter 3] provides OSHA compliance officers and safety and health professionals with general information on the types of construction activities involving worker exposure to lead and the feasible engineering and work practice controls to reduce these exposures. The construction activities identified range from those such as abrasive blasting and welding, cutting, and burning, where exposures to lead are often high, to encapsulating lead-based paint or using lead pots, where exposures are generally low."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Lead in Construction (PDF 1 MB) space
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Lead in Construction Advisor 1.0 space
"This program provides interactive expert help on OSHA's Lead in Construction standard (29CFR1926.62). Once installed on your PC, it asks you about work policies and practices. Then, it asks follow-up questions based on your answers, in order to provide help regarding coverage of the rule, initial determinations, use of exposure data, and more."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Technical Links: Lead exposure space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Preventing Lead Poisoning in Construction Workers space
Lead poisoning may occur in workers during abrasive blasting, sanding, cutting, burning, or welding of bridges and other steel structures coated with lead-containing paints. This NIOSH Alert provides case reports of 42 constructions workers at 8 different worksites who developed lead poisoning, and recommends measures for reducing lead exposure and preventing lead poisoning among workers involved in demolishing or maintaining bridges and other steel structures.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Protecting Workers Exposed to Lead-Based Paint Hazards: A report to congress space
This report summarizes current information regarding the health effects of occupational lead exposures, high-risk exposure settings, surveillance and intervention capabilities, and methods for control, sampling and analysis of lead exposures. It also provides recommendations for reducing hazardous occupational lead abatement exposures.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

New Shroud Design Controls Silica Dust from Surface Mine and Construction Blast Hole Drills space
NIOSH Hazard Control
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

NIOSH Issues Nationwide Alert on Silicosis space
"A nationwide Alert to warn workers involved in rock drilling that they may be at risk for developing silicosis -- a chronic, irreversible, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease which is completely preventable."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

NIOSH Warns of silicosis risks in construction, suggests measures to reduce exposure space
"Exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust during construction activities can cause silicosis -- a serious and potentially fatal respiratory disease -- but employers and workers can take practical steps to reduce risks, according to an Alert released by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

OSHA Silica Advisor space
"An expert training and information aid. It includes current information that will assist businesses and workers in identifying potential silica hazards in their workplaces by choosing appropriate sampling and analytical techniques, comparing monitoring results with the silica exposure limits, and selecting appropriate short-term and long-term control options." Select the "Silica" link to download the files.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Technical Links: Silica, crystalline space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

NIOSH: Silica topic page space
Provides links and references for silica.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Preventing Silicosis and Deaths from Sandblasting space
This Alert describes 99 cases of silicosis from exposure to crystalline silica during sandblasting. It recommends measures to reduce such exposures in the workplace.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Code of Practice No.14: Demolition (PDF 764 KB)
"Demolition is a 71 page guide that provides practical guidance on measures to be taken to prevent injury and disease to people engaged in work on demolition sites, and to any others who might be exposed to risks arising from the demolition process. See also Demolition (Amendment No.1)."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia

Electrical


Working Safely around Electricity (PDF 1.9 MB)  updated itemspace
This booklet explains the dangers of working on and around energized low- and high-voltage equipment and conductors. It is written for supervisors and workers who work around and with electrical circuits and power lines as part of their job and who are familiar with the basic hazards of electrical contact. The three sections include the dangers of low-voltage contact, the dangers of high-voltage contact, and how to deal with electrical shock injuries. Workers who work around electrical conductors, such as painters and equipment operators, and who are unfamiliar with all the hazards of electrical contact, will also find the information in this booklet useful.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store
* A free ebook version for iPad is available on iTunes
Updated: February 2012

Electrical Safety (Web book) space
Electricity can be our best friend - or our worst enemy. When handled improperly, electricity can injure or kill. This interactive web book uses text and video to explain the dangers of working around and on energized low-voltage equipment and near high-voltage conductors. It is written for supervisors and workers who work around and with electrical equipment and near power lines.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

High Powered (PDF 160 KB)space
"Unseen and unheard, it can maim and kill in surprisingly small doses and it doesn't discriminate. No jobsite is without it and no worker is immune to its potential impact. Yet for most employees - apart from those who work directly with electricity - the source of such enormous power is out of sight and out of mind. Until it's too late." Article from WorkSafe Magazine, November/December 2009.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Shock Treatment (PDF 265 KB)space
"Any tradesman who fails to maintain a safe distance from overhead power lines is making a deadly error in judgment." Article from WorkSafe Magazine, September/October 2009.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

GFCIs and Assured Grounding Program (PDF 42 KB) space
A WorkSafe bulletin outlining good work practices for the efficient use of ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs).
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

A GFCI Solution You Can Live With space
Custom-made GFCI system helps construction company improve safety. (Prevention at Work)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

3 Keys of Electrical Safety space
"Electricity is a part of our everyday lives and must be treated with respect. If you work around power lines, you need to know the 3 Keys of Electrical Safety."
Source: BC Hydro

Electrical Incidents space
OSHA Construction e-tool.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Controlling Electrical Hazards space
"This booklet provides an overview of basic electrical safety for individuals with little or limited training or familiarity with electrical hazards."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Ground Fault Protection on Construction Sites (PDF 100 KB) space
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Lockout: A guide to safe work practices (video)

video thumbnail This video provides a comprehensive overview on locks used to control energy in machines. Protect your workers from accidents caused by the inadvertent operation of control devices. (35 min 39 s)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Lockout (PDF 2.4 MB) space
This booklet defines lockout, explains lockout policy and procedures, and provides guidance on compliance with Regulation requirements.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Also available in the following languages:

* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store
* A free ebook version for iPad is available on iTunes
Updated: September 2005

A Bright Arc: A video guide to powerline safety (video)

video  thumbnail This seven part video deals with the dangers of working near overhead and underground powerlines. Dramatic footage and computer animation show what can happen if you or someone on your job site accidentally contacts an energized powerline. (12 min 52 s)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

OSHA Technical Links: Power transmission & distribution in construction space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Preventing Electrocutions During Work with Scaffolds Near Overhead Power Lines space
Workers may be electrocuted when erecting, moving, or working from metal or conductive scaffolds near overhead power lines. This Alert describes 13 deaths that occurred in six separate incidents when workers erected or moved scaffolds that came into contact with energized, overhead power lines, or when they contacted overhead power lines while using conductive tools or materials from scaffolds. It recommends precautions to prevent such electrocutions and injuries.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Preventing Electrocutions of Crane Operators and Crew Members Working Near Overhead Power Lines space
Workers are killed each year when cranes contact overhead power lines. This [NIOSH] Alert describes five cases (six electrocutions) that resulted from such hazards and makes recommendations for preventing similar incidents.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Worker Deaths by Electrocution: A summary of surveillance findings and investigative case reports space
"Many American workers are exposed to electrical energy daily during the performance of their tasks. This monograph highlights the magnitude of the problem of occupational electrocutions in the U.S., identifies potential risk factors for fatal injury, and provides recommendations for developing effective safety programs to reduce the risk of electrocution." The construction industry had the highest percentage (40%) and highest rate (2.4 per 100,000 workers) of electrocutions over the period 1980 through 1992.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Industry Standard: Electrical installations on construction sites (PDF 3 MB)
"This Industry Standard is designed to assist the construction industry to provide and maintain an acceptable level of electrical safety so as to safeguard construction workers and the general public from electrocution and electric shock."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia

Fall Protection


Fall Protection can Save Your Life (video)

video  thumbnail This video shows the consequences of not wearing fall protection and why it's the right choice every time. (2 min. 33 sec.)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Fall Protection: Why would you work without it (video)

video  thumbnail This video takes a light-hearted approach to the serious issue of fall protection. (0 min 40 sec.)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Fall Protection (video)

video  thumbnail This six-part video highlights the need for fall protection systems in the workplace. With dramatic footage of accidents and computer animation, this video outlines the steps to develop safe practices when working from heights (11 min. 42 sec.)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Ladder Safety (video)

video  thumbnail Ladder Safety is a video designed to highlight the important safety procedures associated with ladder use on construction sites. The video uses classic B&W comedic film footage and computer graphic simulations to illustrate safe ladder techniques (13 min. 26 sec.)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
You're a Pro: Falls from elevation (video series)

Construction Safety Series CSS1 (PDF 498 KB) space
Booklet focusing on ladder safety and fall protection for residential construction.

Also available in the following languages:

Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store.

Harnessing safety (PDF 151 KB) space
This article from the January/February 2008 issue of WorkSafe Magazine outlines choosing, inspecting, and using a full body harness.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Falls from heights in constructionspace
WorkSafeBC has recently received a number of Notice of Accidents (NOAs) involving workers falling from ladders, scaffolds, roofs, etc. On average, 10 workers die every year after a fall from elevation. The links to resources in this bulletin may help to prevent similar incidents at your workplace.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Fatal Falls Preventable space
"As of mid-June, six construction workers have died in workplace accidents in 1997. Three of these deaths were due to falls from elevations, and could have been prevented." (Prevention at Work)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

An Introduction to Personal Fall Protection Equipment (PDF 545 KB) (Updated: September 2005) space
An introduction to the proper use of personal fall protection equipment. This booklet outlines the safe use and limitations of personal fall protection equipment, including safety belts, harnesses, lanyards, and lifelines.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Also available in the following languages:

* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store

Protecting workers from elevated risks space
WorkSafe Magazine article highlighting the dangers of falling from elevation.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

OSH Answers: Safety belts, harnesses, and lanyards space
Information about safety belts, harnesses, and lanyards presented in a question-and-answer format.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Falls space
OSHA construction e-tool.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Technical Links: Fall protection space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Preventing worker deaths and injuries from falls through skylights and roof openings space
Fatal falls may result from failure to provide appropriate guarding and fall protection for work around skylights, skylight openings, and other roof openings. This Alert describes eight deaths resulting from falls that occurred during work around these openings. It recommends measures to prevents such fatal falls.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Preventing worker injuries and deaths caused by falls from suspension scaffolds space
"Fatal falls [from suspension scaffolds] occur as a result of defective scaffold equipment, improper installation or operation, improper training of workers, or a failure to use appropriate personal fall protection equipment. This Alert describes five incidents resulting in six deaths caused by falls from suspension scaffolds." It recommends measures to prevent serious injuries and fatal falls while working from suspension scaffolds.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Fall Protection: Construction industry favours flexibility in safety space
This Prevention at Work article (May/June 1997) looks at the impact of the WorkSafeBC's "Fall Protection Regulations" (1996) on fatal falls in the construction industry.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

National Code of Practice for the Prevention of Falls in Housing Construction (PDF 1.9 MB)
"Prevention of Falls in Housing Construction is a 47 page guide that provides practical guidance on how to eliminate or reduce risk of falling from height in the housing construction industry."
Source: Safe Work Australia

Code of Practice No.28 - Prevention of Falls in General Construction (PDF 3.2 MB)
"This compliance code applies to fall hazards associated with construction work."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia

Hearing Protection


Construction: How loud is it? PDF (58 KB) space
Provides information on the average construction noise levels.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Welders risk ear damage from hot slagspace
Hazard Alert Injury #07-09.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Hearing Loss Prevention in the Construction Industry (PDF 214 KB) updated item space
Information on setting up a hearing conservation program for the Construction industry.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Updated: October 2012

Construction Noise (PDF 316 KB) space
This report examines the noise exposure of construction workers -- especially labourers, identifies the main noise sources to which workers are exposed to and discusses engineering controls capable of reducing the noise at source.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Sound Advice: A guide to hearing conservation programs (PDF 1 MB) space
This guide explains what is required of a hearing conservation program and provides general information on implementing a hearing conservation program.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Hear for Good: Preventing noise exposure at work (PDF 280 KB) space
This pamphlet explains noise-induced hearing loss, noise control, and hearing protection. It also covers different types of hearing protection and how to fit and care for hearing protection.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Updated: April 2011

Industrial audiometric testing businesses (PDF 88 KB) space
List of facilities and audiometric technicians authorized by WorkSafeBC as meeting the minimum requirements for performing hearing tests under OH&S Regulation 7.8.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

OSHA Technical Links: Occupational noise exposure space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

The Hearing Video space
The Hearing Video demonstrates the proper use and maintenance of hearing protection, how to choose the right protection, and what a hearing test involves. This fun, information-packed video was produced to help employers fulfill regulation requirements to train workers about noise exposure.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Available from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

Welders - Protect Your Ears! space
Preventing ear damage in welders.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Go to the Hearing Loss Prevention pages on Safety at Work for additional information.

Mobile Equipment


StartSafe Safety Tips for Forkliftsspace
This series of safety tips provides information on forklift safety.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) provides information on safety hazards for forklift trucks:

Source: CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety)

Code of Practice No.19 - Plant (PDF 365 KB)
"Plant is a 99 page guide that provides practical guidance on how to protect people when using plant and associated systems of work that can pose risks their health or safety in the workplace."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia
(1995)

Personal Protective Equipment


Breathe Safer: How to use respirators safely and start a respirator program (PDF 3.4 MB) space
This manual, developed for employers, supervisors, and workers, describes different types of breathing hazards and respirators. It also explains how to choose, fit, and care for a respirator. This manual also contains a section on effective respiratory protection programs.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Available in print from WorkSafeBC Store.
Updated: October 2011

Toolbox Meeting Guides

These guides include information on specific construction safety topics to help conduct effective toolbox talks.

Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

OSHA Technical Links: Personal protective equipment space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Click on the links below to see additional information on ppe.

Residential


imageAsbestos: be aware enforcement initiative
From March 17 to December 31, 2014, WorkSafeBC prevention officers will conduct planned inspections of single-family demolition worksites to ensure homeowners, prime contractors, hazardous material survey contractors, asbestos abatement contractors, and consultants are informed and equipped to safely remove asbestos containing materials and are complying with the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. More information on the initiative.


thumbnail
Stay on Top Enforcement Blitz
From June 25 to November 3, 2012, WorkSafeBC prevention officers will conduct inspections to ensure compliance among slope roofers and framers working on single-family residential projects. These inspections will focus on planning, supervision, and safe access to the worksite, in order to prevent serious injuries caused by falls from heights.
   
thumbnail

Training and Orientation for Young and New Workers: A guide for residential construction employers (PDF 110 KB)
This document explains the Young and New Worker Regulation and outlines how residential construction employers can conduct orientation and training for young and new workers.

Also available in Punjabi
ਜਵਾਨ ਅਤੇ ਨਵੇਂ ਕਾਮਿਆਂ ਲਈ ਸਿਖਲਾਈ ਅਤੇ ਸੇਧ: ਰਿਹਾਇਸ਼ੀ ਉਸਾਰੀ ਰੁਜ਼ਗਾਰਦਾਤਾਵਾਂ ਲਈ ਗਾਈਡ (Punjabi PDF 255 KB)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
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Sample residential construction orientation checklist
A Word document you can easily adapt while creating a checklist specific to your worksite.

Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Construction Safety Series (PDF 498 KB) space
Booklet focusing on ladder safety and fall protection for residential construction.

Also available in the following languages:

Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store

Renovation and restoration projects WorkSafe Bulletin 05-06 (PDF 85 KB)
This WorkSafe bulletin describes what's required of you and your contractor before you start your renovation or restoration projects.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Roofing projects WorkSafe Bulletin 05-05 (PDF 60KB)
Finding a competent and reliable contractor is your first step in a successful roofing project.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Asbestos Hazards When Renovating Older Homes PH71 (PDF 405 KB) space
Asbestos products may be found in older homes. This brochure explains the hazards of asbestos exposure for homeowners who are doing renovations. It provides sources of information for homeowners and employers.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Updated: July 2011

Safe Work Practices for House Construction (PDF 2.3 MB) space
This manual was developed for house builders, framers, scaffold users, various trades, and homeowners. It provides general information on the safety requirements for the various phases of house construction and focuses on key areas where the risk of injury can be reduced.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Updated: November 2009
This booklet is also available in high-resolution print quality

Selected Construction Regulations (SCOR) for the Home Building Industry (29 CFR 1926) space
"The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has published this document to assist residential construction employers and employees in providing safe and healthful workplaces. This publication identifies OSHA standards applicable to the hazards most commonly found at work sites in the residential construction industry and those most likely to have a significant positive impact on the safety and health practices of contractors within this industry."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Roofing


Flat Roofing (PDF 2 MB)
(Updated: October 2006)
This booklet supports and supplements regulations and equipment manufacturers' requirements by detailing general safe work practices and procedures specific to flat roofing.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Available from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

Roofing projects WorkSafe Bulletin 05-05
Finding a competent and reliable contractor is your first step in a successful roofing project.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Falls from heights in constructionspace
WorkSafeBC has recently received a number of Notice of Accidents (NOAs) involving workers falling from ladders, scaffolds, roofs, etc. On average, 10 workers die every year after a fall from elevation. The links to resources in this bulletin may help to prevent similar incidents at your workplace.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

High time (PDF 191 KB) space
This article from the July/August 2011 issue of WorkSafe Magazine discusses the importance of safety and training for steep slope roofers.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Custom guardrail system that travels well (PDF 545 KB) space
This article (on page 10 WorkSafe Magazine, vol. 1, no. 2, March/April 2000) describes an innovative U-shaped guardrail system that can be customized to fit any size roof to protect workers from falls.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Preventing Worker Deaths and Injuries from Falls Through Skylights and Roof Openings space
Fatal falls may result from failure to provide appropriate guarding and fall protection for work around skylights, skylight openings, and other roof openings. This Alert describes eight deaths resulting from falls that occurred during work around these openings. It recommends measures to prevents such fatal falls.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Scaffolding


Access Frame Scaffolding CD
This CD includes:

  • Step-by-step instructions for erecting access frame scaffolding
  • Scaffolding terminology
  • Resources including the parts of the OH&S Regulation that apply to frame scaffolding
Click to run scaffolding CD

Click on the image to run the CD (To hear the audio commentary please ensure that your computer speakers are turned on.)
Download the CD (zip file 9 MB) or
Call 1-866 271-4879 to purchase a copy of the disk.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Parts of OHS Regulation that apply to Frame Scaffolding space
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Access Frame Scaffolding Posters space
Two posters describing access frame scaffolding terminology and how to erect access frame scaffolding are now available.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Descriptive Terminology Poster (PDF 2 MB)
How to Erect Access Frame Scaffolding (PDF 2 MB)
Copies of the posters (size 22 x 30 in) can be purchased from Publications, Videos, and Forms Distribution.

List of Items You May Require for Your Frame Scaffold (PDF 21 KB) space
This resource lists items that you may require for your frame scaffold.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Infrastructure Health and Safety Association space
"IHSA was formed in January 2010 by amalgamating the Construction Safety Association of Ontario (CSAO), the Electrical & Utilities Safety Association of Ontario (E&USA), and Transportation Health and Safety Association of Ontario (THSAO)."
Source: Infrastructure Health and Safety Association

OSHA Technical Links: Scaffolding space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

A Guide to Scaffold Use in the Construction Industry (PDF 2 MB) space
This booklet addresses some of the most common questions about OSHA's scaffold standard. It is organized in a question-and-answer format to highlight information that employers and employees need to know.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Scaffolding eCAT space
"This eCAT [electronic compliance tool] provides illustrated safety checklists for specific types of scaffolds. Hazards are identified, as well as the controls that keep those hazards from becoming tragedies. Only the Fabricated Frame section of the Supported Scaffolds is available at this time."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Site Preparation & Excavation


Excavations: A guide to safe work practices (video)

video thumbnail This six part video demonstrates the common hazards associated with excavations, plus the procedures for preparing and working in a trench. (20 min 46 s)
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

BC ONE CALL: Call before you dig (video) space
This video focuses on the purpose of BC ONE CALL as well as the financial and legal responsibilities of contractors. If you are responsible for causing damage to an underground facility you may be liable for all costs resulting from flooding, fire, loss of business, and environmental damage.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
To obtain a copy of the video please phone (604) 214-5456.
Visit the BC 1 CALL website for more information.

Excavation safety is your responsibility space
This information sheet outlines the steps and requirements you should take before you begin excavating near natural gas lines.
Source: Fortis BC

Sloping and Timber Shoring (PDF 990 KB)
This manual describes methods for sloping and timber shoring, including pre-excavation requirements, information on site inspections, and general sloping or shoring requirements.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Prevention of Damage to Buried Facilities in British Columbia (PDF 242 KB)
This publication will help workers, employers, contractors, consultants, and owners be aware of the potential hazards, legislated requirements, and best practices associated with ground disturbances in the vicinity of buried facilities.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store
* A free ebook version for iPad is available on iTunes
Updated: June 5, 2012

Hydraulic Excavators: Lifting with slings (PDF 117 KB) space
An excavator is used primarily to dig and load. A crane is the preferred method for lifting materials or equipment; however, there may be times when using an excavator is a practical solution to an immediate need. If using the excavator is the practicable solution, good planning will maximize both the safety of the workers involved and the efficiency of the lift.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Underground Utility Hits - NI (PDF 51 KB) space
"This update contains details from selected "Notice of Incidents" (NI) received by the Worker and Employer Services Division of WorkSafeBC. It is intended to provide employers and workers with timely information about the type of accidents occurring in their industry."
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Excavations space
"This booklet highlights the requirements in the updated [OSHA] standard for excavation and trenching operations, provides methods for protecting employees against cave-ins, and describes safe work practices for employees."
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

NIOSH warns of danger of trench cave-ins space
"The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) warns construction workers that they may be risking their lives when working in trenches or near potentially unstable ground."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Trenching and Excavation space
OSHA Construction e-tool.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Technical Links: Trenching & excavation space
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Preventing Deaths and Injuries from Excavation Cave-ins space
This NIOSH Alert describes four deaths caused by excavation cave-ins and makes several recommendations to avoid recurrence.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Preventing Injuries and Deaths from Skid Steer Loaders space
"Recent NIOSH studies suggest that employers, supervisors, and workers may not appreciate the hazards of operating or working near skid steer loaders; or they may not follow safe work procedures for controlling these hazards. This [NIOSH] Alert describes six deaths involving skid steer loaders and recommends methods for preventing similar incidents."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Code of Practice No.8 - Safety Precautions in Trench Operations (PDF 230 KB)
"Safety Precautions in Trenching Operations is a 32 page guide that provides practical guidance on measures to be taken to prevent injury to persons engaged in trenching work."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia

General


Ladder Safety Series new item
This series has been developed to provide information that should help encourage safe work practices when using ladders.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Materials Handling (2 videos) space
Building materials such as drywall and glass can cause serious injuries if they're stored or handled improperly. These two short videos show the danger and what you can do to handle these materials safely. Warning: Graphic content may not be suitable for all viewers.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Construction Compliance - Field Officer Guide (PDF 2.5 MB) space
This Info Flip is primarily for WorkSafeBC officers to use as a guide during inspections. Employers, contractors, supervisors, and workers may also find the information useful for assisting them in carrying out their occupational health and safety roles and responsibilities.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store

Construction Safety Series (PDF 498 KB) space
Booklet focusing on ladder safety and fall protection for residential construction.

Also available in the following languages:

Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store

Drywall Delivery Safety Access Hatch (PDF 64 KB) space
Drywall delivery to many construction projects, particularly up to four storeys tall, has become more difficult in recent years. Often access to the upper levels is limited to interior staircases requiring delivery workers to carry the drywall up manually. The BC Wall & Ceiling Association recommends the use of a Drywall Delivery Safety Access Hatch. The hatch will ensure a safe and efficient means of placing drywall on the upper levels when there is no safe alternative.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Prime contractor responsibilities (PDF 164 KB) space
Article from the January/February 2008 issue of WorkSafe Magazine.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Safe Drywall Delivery: Options for prime contractors (PDF 60 KB) space
This document describes safe drywall delivery options for multi-level buildings.
Source: British Columbia Wall and Ceiling Association in partnership with WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

A Guide for Protecting Workers from Woodworking Hazards (PDF 543 KB) space
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

ACSA products and materials space
List of products available from the Alberta Construction Safety Association. Includes videos, toolbox brochures, posters, and workplace hazard signs.
Source: ACSA (Alberta Construction Safety Association)

Alerts and bulletins (CanOSH) space
Links to hazard alerts and safety bulletins issued by federal, provincial, and territorial government agencies.

Back belts may not prevent injuries at work (PDF 132 KB) space
WorkSafeBC Ergonomics Commentary.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Back Talk: an owner's manual for backs (PDF 706 KB) space
An illustrated handbook that explains how the back works, provides tips for avoiding injury, and shows how to care for the back during recovery.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Updated: November 2011
* Print copies are available for purchase from the WorkSafeBC Store
* A free ebook version for iPad is available on iTunes

Back Belts: Do they prevent injury? space
"This pamphlet outlines the current state of scientific knowledge on back belts and stresses the importance of an overall ergonomics program. Companies should not rely on back belts as a 'cure all' for back injury, but should begin to undertake prevention measures which reduce the risks of lifting tasks."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Balanced tool belts can start your back off in the right position (PDF 128 KB) space
A Constructive Ideas information sheet.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Building a safer construction industry (PDF 545 KB) space
According to "Building a Safer Construction Industry," (page 8, WorkSafe Magazine, vol. 1, no. 2 March/April 2000), education is the answer to making the construction industry safer. This industry is one of the most dangerous for workers in BC, with an injury rate more than double that of all workers in the province.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Chainsaw Safety (PDF 327 KB) space
Although this pamphlet still contains valuable information on the do's and don'ts of chainsaw operation, more up-to-date information on personal protective equipment and first aid can be found on this website at:  Resources for Falling and Bucking.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Ergonomics Ideas Bankspace
Ideas to reduce ergonomic risk factors in construction and other industries.
Source: Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

How to hire a safety training providerspace
This article breaks down the process of hiring a safety training provider into three easy steps. From WorkSafe Magazine, January/February 2007 edition.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Safe use of ladders and stepladders
"This leaflet gives advice to employers, employees and self-employed people on simple, sensible precautions to take when using ladders and stepladders to work at height."
Source: Health & Safety Executive, UK (HSE)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Cold Stress Card (PDF 373 KB)
Quick reference card with information about frostbite and hypothermia.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)
(Revised: 1999)

Effective Health and Safety Programs: the key to a safe workplace and defence of due diligence (PDF 532 KB)
This guide defines due diligence; explains how WorkSafeBC assesses compliance; identifies the elements of a health and safety program; and explains how health and safety programs help establish due diligence.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Updated: December 2005
* Available in print from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

3 Steps to Effective Worker Education and Training (PDF 1 MB) (Updated: April 2012)
This guide is meant to help employers and supervisors keep new and young workers safe on the job --- and prevent painful and costly work-related injuries. This guide consists of three basic steps that will help you accomplish this. The three steps are as follows:

  1. Provide new and young workers with safety orientation and basic training before they start working.
  2. Train new and young workers for tasks specific to their jobs.
  3. Provide supervision and ongoing training for workers to ensure that they continue to work safely.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Available in print from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

Heat Stress Card (PDF 23 KB)
Quick reference card with information about frostbite and hypothermia.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

How to Implement a Formal Occupational Health and Safety Program (PDF 432 KB) updated
This booklet is a complete revision of How to Implement an Effective Occupational Health and Safety Program. This revision will help employers, workers, and joint health and safety committees develop and maintain an effective occupational health and safety (OHS) program.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
Revised April 2012

Investigation of Accidents and Incidents Reference Guide and Workbook(PDF 2.7 MB)
Discusses concepts and methods for implementing and performing effective investigations in the workplace.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee Foundation Workbook (PDF 1.8 MB)
Looks at concepts and methods for developing and maintaining an effective health and safety committee.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Preventing Heat Stress at Work (PDF 2 MB) (Updated: February 2007) space
This booklet provides a basic overview of job-related heat stress, how to recognize and treat heat stress, and how to prevent heat stress.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC

Also available in the following languages:

* Available in print from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

Safety on the Job is Everyone's Business: the responsibilities of employers, supervisors and workers (PDF 120 KB)
All new workers need training in equipment use and safe work procedures. This pamphlet covers the basics in training new workers. Employer, supervisor, and worker responsibilities for developing and maintaining a safe workplace are outlined.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Available in print from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

Take Care: How to develop and implement a workplace violence prevention program (PDF 467 KB) (Updated: December 2006)
This guide enables employers and workers to implement a program to prevent violence in the workplace. It summarizes the relevant sections of the Regulation that deal with violence in the workplace, explains how to conduct a risk assessment, identifies the basic elements of a violence prevention program, and provides safe travel tips and sample documents.
Source: WorkSafeBC WorkSafeBC
* Available in print from Publications, Videos and Forms Distribution.

OSH Answers: Ergonomics
A set of information sheets using question-and-answer format to provide information about a range of ergonomics-related topics (back injury prevention, pushing and pulling, working in a sitting position, working in a standing position, manual materials handling work hazards, etc.)
Source: CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety)

OSH Answers: Foot comfort and safety at work
Information about foot comfort and safety at work presented in a question-and-answer format.
Source: CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety)

OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements
OSHA issued a revised rule to improve the system employers use to track and record workplace injuries and illnesses.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSH Answers: Safety footwear
Information about safety footwear presented in a question-and-answer format.
Source: CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety)

OSH Answers: Safety glasses and face protectors
Information about safety glasses and face protectors presented in a question-and-answer format.
Source: CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety)

OSH Answers: Vibration
Information about vibration presented in a question-and-answer format.
Source: CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety)

OSHA Technical Links: Fire safety
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

OSHA Technical Links: Occupational noise exposure
List of "technical links" to internal and external online resources.
Source: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Adolescent Workers
"This [NIOSH} Alert summarizes available information about work-related injuries among adolescents, identifies work that is especially hazardous, and offers recommendations for prevention."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
(May 1995)

Promoting Safe Work for Young Workers
A guide on promoting safety among young workers, based on the experiences of three NIOSH-funded projects.
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
(November 1999)

Workplace Use of Back Belts: Review and recommendations (PDF 10 MB)
"The effectiveness of using back belts to lessen the risk of back injury among uninjured workers remains unproven. The NIOSH [Back Belt] Working Group does not recommend the use of back belts to prevent injuries among uninjured workers, and does not consider back belts to be personal protective equipment."
Source: NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
(May 1994)

Industry Standard - Contaminated Construction Sites (PDF 239 KB)
"The Industry Standard for Contaminated Construction Sites is a 30 page publication providing employers and workers with practical guidance on identifying site contamination and managing the risk of exposure to harmful contaminants during construction work. This Industry Standard was jointly developed for Foundations for Safety Victoria by WorkSafe and EPA Victoria."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia
(2005)

Manual Handling
Health and safety topic portal for manual handling from WorkSafe Victoria.
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia
(2000)

Confined Spaces - Shafts, Tunnels & Trenches (PDF 428 KB)
"This publication provides guidance on how to apply the definition of a confined space to all types of excavations and some basic information on how to identify hazards and assess and control the risks associated with these confined spaces."
Source: WorkSafe Victoria, Australia
(2003)



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