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Guidelines Part 13

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Guidelines Part 13 Division 1 - General

G13.1 Types of work platforms

Issued January 1, 2005; Revised March 8, 2007

Regulatory excerpt
Section 13.1 of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") includes the following definitions:

"boom-supported" means supported by an elevating device that telescopes, articulates, rotates or extends relative to the machine base or vehicle, so that the platform can be positioned completely beyond the base;

"boatswain's chair", also known as a bosun's chair, means a seat attached to a suspended rope designed to accommodate one person in a sitting position;

"elevating work platform" means a movable work platform that self-elevates to overhead work locations;

"movable work platform" means a work platform that can be re-positioned during the course of the work;

"permanent powered platform" means a movable work platform that

(a) is raised or lowered by other than manual means, and

(b) is permanently installed on or attached to a building or structure;

"portable powered platform" means a movable work platform that

(a) is raised or lowered by other than manual means, and

(b) is not permanently installed on or attached to a building or structure;

"scaffold" means any temporary elevated work platform and its supporting structure used for supporting workers, materials or equipment;

"self-propelled" means the capability of an elevating work platform to travel under power with the primary controls on the work platform;

"swing stage" means a work platform that is raised and lowered by manual or powered hoisting equipment, supported by 2 or more suspension lines;

"work platform" means an elevated or suspended temporary work surface used for supporting workers and includes a scaffold and boatswain's chair.

Purpose of guideline
This guideline provides a chart to show the various types of work platforms covered by Part 13 of the Regulation, and a brief explanation of some types of movable platforms.

Chart - Types of work platforms

Chart shows two different types of work platforms: scaffolding, and movable work platforms. Movable work platforms are divided into three different categories: suspended staging, elevating work platforms, and platforms supported by other equipment. Explanations of terms are provided below.

Explanation of terms
Confusion sometimes arises about the differences between some of the terms in the chart, particularly related to movable work platforms. The following explanations are intended to assist the reader.

Movable work platforms: A movable work platform is a platform that can be moved, manually or by power, in either the vertical or horizontal direction, or both, and covers a range of types of equipment. The different types of movable work platform shown in the chart can be discussed in three groups: suspended staging, elevating work platforms, and platforms supported by other equipment.

  • Suspended staging (permanent powered platforms, swing stages, and boatswain's chairs): These are all movable platforms that are supported by line(s) from a building or structure, and can be repositioned vertically during use.

     

  • Elevating work platforms: An elevating work platform is one that self-elevates, and includes design features for lateral mobility (travel). If the platform travels under power when operated by controls on the work platform it is termed "self propelled." There are two types of self propelled units, those that are boom supported, and other designs, such as self-propelled scissor lifts.

     

    Alternatively, if an elevating work platform is moved by hand or is attached to the deck of a powered vehicle, it is called a "portable elevating work platform." There are a range of types of portable elevating work platforms in use, from elevating equipment mounted on service trucks, to compressed gas power lifts that are moved by hand. Mast climbers that provide access to the face of a building, and that can be repositioned vertically as work proceeds are also included in this group.

     

  • Platforms supported by other equipment (lift truck supported, and crane or hoist supported): A platform that is elevated by another piece of equipment is not an elevating work platform, because the platform itself is not designed to be capable of elevating. Examples of this type of work platform are those that are positioned and supported by a crane, hoist, or lift truck. These platforms are movable, but they are not elevating.
G13.2 Standards

Issued January 1, 2005; Editorial Revision May 2005; Editorial Revision August 12, 2008; Editorial Revision September 1, 2009; Editorial Revision March 31, 2010; Editorial Revision May 17, 2012; Revised April 1, 2013

Regulatory excerpt
Section 13.2(1) of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

A ladder, window cleaner's belt or work platform must meet and be used in accordance with

(a) the applicable CSA or ANSI standard in effect when the equipment or structure was manufactured, except as otherwise determined by the Board,

(b) another standard acceptable to the Board, or

(c) if there is no applicable standard under paragraphs (a) or (b), the requirements of a professional engineer.

Purpose of guideline
The purpose of this guideline is to provide a list of some common applicable standards under section 13.2(1)(a). The guideline also provides a list of standards acceptable to WorkSafeBC under section 13.2(1)(b). Refer to OHS Guideline G13.2(1)-2 Application of CSA and ANSI standards for suspended stages.

List of standards under section 13.2(1)
Agency Standard number Standard title6
CSA1B354.1 Portable Elevating Work Platforms
CSAB354.2 Self-propelled Elevating Work Platforms
CSA B354.4 Self-propelled Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms
CSA B354.5 Mast-climbing work platforms
CSA C225 Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Devices
CSA S269.2 Access Scaffolding for Construction Purposes
CSA Z11 Portable Ladders
CSA Z91-02 Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations
CSA Z185 Safety Code for Personnel Hoists
CSA Z271 Safety Code for Suspended Platforms
CSA Z323.5 Mechanical/Electromechanical Lifting Devices for Persons
CSA Z797 Code of Practice for Access Scaffold
WCB2 WPL2-2004 Design, Construction and Use of Crane Supported Work Platforms
WCB LDR1-2004 Job Built Ladders
WCB WPL3-2004 Safety Factor and Minimum Breaking Strength for Suspended Work Platforms and Associated Components
WCB WPL1-2004 Design, Construction and Use of Wood Frame Scaffolds
WCB WorkSafeBC13.30 Work Platforms supported by Lift Trucks
ANSI3 A10.22 Safety Requirements for Rope-Guided and Non Guided Workmen's Hoists
ANSIA10.8American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations - Scaffolding - Safety Requirements
ANSI A120.1Powered Platforms for Exterior Building Maintenance
ANSI A14.1 Safety Requirements for Portable Wood Ladders
ANSI A14.2 Safety Requirements for Portable Metal Ladders
ANSI A14.3 American National Standard for Ladders - Fixed - Safety Requirements
ANSI A14.5 Safety Requirements for Portable Reinforced Plastic Ladders
ANSI A14.7 Safety Requirements for Mobile Ladder Stands and Mobile Ladder Stand Platforms
ANSI A39.1 Safety Code for Window Cleaning
ANSIA92.1Mobile Ladder Stands and Scaffolds (Towers), Manually Propelled
ANSIA92.2Vehicle-Mounted Elevating and Rotating Aerial Devices (Work Platforms)
ANSI A92.3 American National Standard for Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms
ANSI A92.5 Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms
ANSI A92.6 American National Standard for Self-propelled Elevating Work Platforms
ANSI A92.8 American National Standard for Vehicle-Mounted Bridge Inspection and Maintenance Devices
ANSI A92.9 American National Standard for Mast-Climbing Work Platforms
ASME4 B30.23 Personnel Lifting Systems
ANSI B56.1 Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks
ANSI B56.6 Safety Standard for Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks
ANSI A14.4 Job-Made Ladders, Safety Requirements for
ASTM5 C 478M Standard Specification for Precast Reinforced Concrete Manhole Sections

1CSA: Canadian Standards Association
2WCB: WorkSafeBC (Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia)
3ANSI: American National Standards Institute
4ASME: American Society of Mechanical Engineers
5ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials
6Standard titles may vary between published editions of a Standard

G13.2(1) Ship's ladders

Issued May 25, 2005

Regulatory excerpt
Section 13.2(1) (Standards) of the OHS Regulation states:

(1) A ladder, window cleaner's belt or work platform must meet and be used in accordance with

(a) the applicable CSA or ANSI standard in effect when the equipment or structure was manufactured, except as otherwise determined by the Board,

(b) another standard acceptable to the Board, or

(c) if there is no applicable standard under paragraphs (a) or (b), the requirements of a professional engineer.

Purpose of this guideline
This guideline sets out the circumstances where a "ship's ladder" would normally be acceptable for use. It also provides guidance on the expectations of the Board for the design, installation and use of such a ladder.

What is a ship's ladder?
A ship's ladder, as addressed by this guideline, means a permanently installed steep pitched stair-like structure having rigid treads supported by rigid side rails, with handrails on each side. It does not include a ladder configuration made of treads or rungs supported by "side rails" made of fibre or wire rope. While the ladder is referred to as a ship's ladder, the usage covered in this guideline is with respect to land-based applications as described below.

Where are they appropriate?
A ship's ladder should only be considered for use where a conventional stairway cannot be installed due to limited space. Installation should be limited to places where only occasional use is required, such as for servicing machinery or equipment on a typical frequency of less than daily.

There is no CSA or ANSI standard that has been issued to address ship's ladders. In the absence of a standard the Board has a number of expectations for the design, installation and use of these ladders under section 13.2(1) of the OHS Regulation, which are outlined below.

Ladder design and installation
A ship's ladder should:

  • be designed so the angle between the side rails and the horizontal is between 50 and 70 degrees. The preferred angle is in the range of 60 to 68 degrees.
  • serve only a single platform or landing and have a maximum height of 4 metres (12 feet)
  • have treads at least 130 millimetres (mm) (5 inches) wide, with a nonskid finish, uniformly spaced at not more than 305 mm (12 inches). Treads should be at least 430 mm (17 inches) long, but not longer than 630 mm (24 inches).
  • have a minimum design working load of 1.1 kiloNewtons (kN) (250 pounds) applied uniformly to a 90 mm (3.5 inch) strip across the centre of the tread
  • have handrails provided on both sides of the ladder at approximately 900 mm (36 inches) above the tread nosing
  • have a safety guard installed parallel to the slope of the ladder and offset approximately 150 mm (6 inches) from the rear of the treads. (This guard is to stop a worker's leg from passing through to the backside of the ladder if a foot slips off the back side of the tread.)

Note that a ship's ladder is a permanent load-carrying structure and needs to be properly engineered, as required by section 13.2(1)(c). Design drawings and specifications should show all information necessary for the fabrication and installation of the ship's ladder, including details on how it is to be secured in place. The completed installation will need to be certified by a professional engineer as being fabricated and installed in accordance with good engineering practice.

Ladder use
The user of a ship's ladder should:

  • be trained on the correct way to use the ladder
  • face the ladder when ascending or descending
  • have both hands free to grasp the handrails when using the ladder. Tools or other items which prevent both hands from being free to grasp the handrails should not be carried up or down the ladder.
  • maintain "three points of contact" when using the ladder. Three points of contact means two feet and one hand or two hands and one foot in contact with the ladder and handrails at all times. (This is recommended practice when using any type of ladder.)
G13.2(1)(b) Ladders in manholes

Issued January 1, 2005

Section 13.2(1) of the OHS Regulation states:

(1) A ladder, window cleaner's belt or work platform must meet and be used in accordance with

(a) the applicable CSA or ANSI standard in effect when the equipment or structure was manufactured, except as otherwise determined by the Board,

(b) another standard acceptable to the Board, or

(c) if there is no applicable standard under paragraphs (a) or (b), the requirements of a professional engineer.

This guideline sets out a standard acceptable to the Board for the design and construction of an individual rung ladder in a manhole that is part of a water, sewer or storm sewer system. These manholes typically have an outside diameter of 48 inches or less, and may have a tapering cone section near the top. For these structures it is recognized that the amount of interior space for access and to perform work is limited and the access ladder arrangement needs to provide for safe access while not protruding unnecessarily into the entry and work space. The Board recognizes the ASTM Specification C 478M Standard Specification for Precast Reinforced Concrete Manhole Sections as a standard acceptable to the Board under section 13.2(1)(b) for an individual rung ladder in such manholes. (Note this version is the metric companion to ASTM Specification C 478, which is also acceptable to the Board.) This standard refers to an individual rung as a "step".

ASTM Specification C 478M was developed for manholes assembled using precast concrete components for the base, riser, cone, and top sections. Manholes are also assembled using components for these sections made from other materials. Manhole steps or individual rungs will be cast, mortared or attached by mechanical means to the walls of base, riser or cone sections. Steps or rungs in a manhole must meet the design, material, dimension, and testing and acceptance criteria of the ASTM Specification C 478M, regardless of the material used to make the risers or cone sections.

ASTM Specification C 478M requires steps in a manhole's base, riser(s) and conical top section be aligned to form a continuous ladder with steps (rungs) equally spaced vertically at a maximum spacing of 400 millimetres (16 inches). Rungs must project a minimum clear distance of 100 millimetres (4 inches) from the wall of the base, riser or cone section measured at the point of embedment or attachment. The minimum clear distance between the rung and the opposite wall of the riser or cone must be 450 millimetres (18 inches) measured at the centre face of the rung. The minimum width of a step or rung is 250 millimetres (10 inches).

The maximum distance down from the entry level (rim of the manhole cover) to the centerline of the first rung below entry level in any manhole should be 500 mm (20 inches) where no handhold is provided above the first rung. Where a handhold is provided between the entry level and the first rung, the maximum distance may be increased to not more than 660 mm (26 inches).

ASTM Specification C 478M does not require any additional ladder safety features, such as a cage, rest platform or ladder climbing device, regardless of the length of climb. Safety cages and rest platforms should not be used in a manhole as they may impede rescue or retrieval procedures. A worker entering a deep manhole, such as one more than 5 metres (16 feet) deep, should use a personal fall protection/rescue harness system which will arrest a fall and allow for rescue/recovery if necessary. Such systems are often part of the employer's confined space entry program for work in and around manholes.

A worker assigned to enter manholes should receive training that includes awareness of the limited step depth and width for manhole rungs and the need to proceed cautiously when climbing into or out of a manhole. Training should also include procedures to assess the integrity of the steps or rungs when going into a manhole that has not been entered for a while, as rungs may have deteriorated due to corrosion or become loose due to deterioration of the supporting concrete or other material in the riser or cone sections.

The above acceptance of ASTM Specification C 478M is intended to apply to manholes where entry into such manholes is infrequent; for example, access to manholes is typically in the range of once or twice per year. If more regular access is required, such as monthly or more frequently, ladder access meeting the requirements of ANSI Standard A14.3 American National Standard for ladders-fixed-safety requirements should be provided. It is not the intention of the Board to require existing manholes which are currently used frequently to be modified to accommodate a fixed ladder. However, new facilities where frequent entry is going to be made should be sized and installed with a proper fixed ladder. A ladder in a well or shaft is required to meet the ANSI standard.

G13.2(1)-2 Application of CSA and ANSI standards for suspended stages

Issued December 3, 2007; Revised April 1, 2013

Regulatory excerpt
Section 13.2(1) of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states, in part:

A ladder, window cleaner's belt or work platform must meet and be used in accordance with

(a) the applicable CSA or ANSI standard in effect when the equipment or structure was manufactured, except as otherwise determined by the Board,

...

Purpose of guideline
WorkSafeBC has determined that suspended stage work platforms must meet and be used in accordance with specific standards. The purpose of this guideline is to describe the required standards for suspended stage work platforms.

Background information
Suspended stages are movable work platforms that are supported by line(s) from a building or structure, and can be repositioned vertically during use. They include permanent powered platforms, swing stages, and boatswain's (bosun's) chairs. Refer to OHS Guideline G13.1 - Types of work platforms.

There are a number of Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards that address design, construction, installation, and use of work platforms. Refer to OHS Guideline G13.2 - Standards for a list of some of these standards. The listed standards specific to suspended stages are (standard titles may vary between different published editions) as follows:

CSA Z271 Safety code for Suspended Platforms
CSA Z91-02 Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations
ANSI A120.1 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance
ANSI A10.8 American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations - Scaffolding - Safety Requirements

Each of these standards has multiple editions, and a number of elements of design, construction, and use are addressed in more than one standard. This has resulted in some confusion as to which is the applicable standard.

Determination of applicable standards for design, construction, and installation of suspended stage equipment
WorkSafeBC has determined that suspended stages must meet the design, construction, and installation requirements (and any associated maintenance requirements) of any of the following applicable CSA and ANSI standards in effect when the equipment was manufactured:

CSA Z271
ANSI A120.1
ANSI A10.8

The applicable editions of CSA Z271 standards for design, construction, and installation of suspended stages used for gaining access to exterior and interior building surfaces and other structures for the purpose of construction, demolition, or building maintenance are as follows:

A. CSA Z271-10 Safety Code for Suspended Platforms
B. CSA Z271-98 Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms
C. CSA Z271-M84 Safety Code for Suspended Powered Platforms
D. Supplement No.1-1977 to CSA Z271-1974
E. CSA Z271-1974 Safety Code for Powered Platforms

The applicable editions of ANSI A120.1 standards for design, construction, and installation of powered suspended stages used to gain access to building surfaces for building maintenance are as follows:

A. ANSI/ASME A120.1-2008 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms and Traveling Ladders and Gantries for Building Maintenance
B. ANSI/ASME A120.1-2006 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms and Traveling Ladders and Gantries for Building Maintenance
C. ANSI/ASME A120.1-2001 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance
D. ANSI/ASME A120.1-1996 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance - Addenda A - 1997; Addenda B - 11/12/1999
E. ANSI/ASME A120.1-1992 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance
F. ANSI/ASME A120.1-1970 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance

Maintenance includes "specific activities such as exterior building cleaning, painting, application of sealants and insulation, brickwork repointing, renovations, inspections, and related building/structure maintenance. ... (and) may also be applied to non-traditional activities, such as observation or photography, that may occasionally be carried out from suspended equipment." (ref. CSA Z91-02, Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations). Exterior building cleaning includes window cleaning.

The applicable ANSI A10.8 standards for design, construction, and installation of suspended stages used to gain access to building surfaces for construction and demolition operations are as follows:

A. ANSI/ASSE A10.8-2011 Scaffolding Safety Requirements
B. ANSI/ASSE A10.8-2001 American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations - Safety Requirements for Scaffolding
C. ANSI A10.8-1998 American National Standard for construction and demolition operations - scaffolding - safety requirements
D. ANSI A10.8-1988 American National Standard for construction and demolition operations - scaffolding - safety requirements
E. ANSI A10.8-1977 American National Standard Requirements for Scaffolding

Determination of applicable standard for the use of suspended stage equipment
WorkSafeBC has determined that the use of a suspended stage must meet the requirements of CSA Z91-02 Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations. This is the required standard regardless of the year of manufacture of the equipment. The standard specifies safety requirements for use of equipment normally used for window and general cleaning, painting, maintenance, inspection, construction operations, and similar work. The following elements of use are addressed in CSA Z91-02:

  • Training requirements for operation and occupancy of suspended stages
  • General safety requirements such as weather restrictions, equipment and tool use and storage, signage, overhead protection, and fall protection
  • Equipment operation, including general safety requirements, maintenance, use of suspended lines and lifelines, fall-arrest equipment, anchorage, support systems, work units, acceptable landings, special applications such as working from operable windows, and rigging techniques and practices
  • Periodic inspection and testing of temporary and permanently installed equipment and anchor systems
  • Documentation, such as the equipment log, roof plan, work plan, rigging plan, and fall protection procedures

There are also informative appendices to this standard. Although these are non-mandatory parts of the standard, they provide useful safety information for users of suspended stages. The appendices are entitled Work Plan and Emergency Response Plan and Washing Windows in Complete Safety.

Other acceptable standards
There may be an instance where a person finds it impracticable to comply with the above standards. In this case, application should be made to WorkSafeBC Regulatory Practices for acceptance of an alternate standard.

Note that Regulation section 2.3 specifies that the provisions of the Regulation prevail if there is any conflict between a prescribed code or standard and the Regulation.

G13.2(1)-3 Training requirements for operators of elevating work platforms  New Item

Issued December 19, 2013

Regulatory excerpt
Section 13.2(1) of the OHS Regulation ("Regulation") states:

(1) A ladder, window cleaner's belt or work platform must meet and be used in accordance with

(a) the applicable CSA or ANSI standard in effect when the equipment or structure was manufactured, except as otherwise determined by the Board,

(b) another standard acceptable to the Board, or

(c) if there is no applicable standard under paragraphs (a) or (b), the requirements of a professional engineer.

Purpose of guideline
The purpose of this guideline is to clarify the training requirements for operators of elevating work platforms.

Applicable standards
Section 13.2 of the Regulation requires that elevating work platforms must be used in accordance with the applicable standards. These standards provide information applicable to the training and retraining of the operators of this equipment, and list the topics that must be covered during the training. The following are some of the standards that include requirements for training operators of elevating work platforms:

  • CSA B354.1 Portable Elevating Work Platforms
  • CSA B354.2 Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms
  • CSA B354.4 Boom-type Elevating Work Platforms
  • ANSI/SIA A92.2 Vehicle-Mounted Elevating and Rotating Aerial Devices
  • ANSI/SIA A92.3 Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms
  • ANSI/SIA A92.5 Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms
  • ANSI/SIA A92.6 Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms

Trainer qualifications
The CSA and ANSI standards referenced in the Regulation also set out the qualifications for the trainer. Persons providing the training must be qualified in accordance with the requirements of the standard that the particular elevating work platform being operated has been manufactured to. Elevating work platforms may also be manufactured to meet more than one standard, such as both the applicable CSA and ANSI standards.

The employer may choose to have the operator training provided by a training agency, a qualified person working for the employer, or by some other qualified individual.

Proof of Training
The standards either require or recommend that upon successful completion of the training, the training provider issues the operator with a document that indicates proof of the training received. Generally, the standards require that the following information is provided:

  • The name of the person trained
  • The date the training took place
  • The name of the organization or entity that provided the training
  • The name of the trainer(s) that delivered the training
  • The specific type of elevating work platform covered by the training (e.g., scissor lift, boom-supported elevating work platform, etc.)
  • The applicable standard under which the program of training was provided

The requirement for the retention of proof of training and retraining documents vary, depending on the applicable standard. In general, CSA standards require that the operator keep the proof of training document with them at all times while operating the equipment; whereas ANSI standards typically require the employer to retain training and retraining records for a period of at least four years, but place no obligation on the operator to keep the proof of training documents with them while operating the equipment.

Retraining and upgrade training
The applicable standards do not require that retraining be conducted at a specific interval. Rather, employers are required to provide retraining to an operator based upon their observations and evaluation of an operator's competency. Where deficiencies are identified, the employer must arrange to provide retraining that addresses the specific operational deficiencies that were identified.

Employers may wish to provide operator retraining on a regular fixed interval. Employers have a duty under section 115(2)(e) of the Workers Compensation Act ("Act") to provide to their workers the information, instruction, training, and supervision necessary to ensure the health and safety of those workers in carrying out their work and to ensure the health and safety of other workers at the workplace. Provided that any operational deficiencies that are identified in the period between the established formal retraining intervals are addressed appropriately, and employers comply with the above requirement, they may determine the frequency of any retraining program they wish to implement.

Where operators are required to operate an elevating work platform that they are not familiar with, the employer must provide operators with adequate upgrade training to ensure that they can demonstrate proficiency in the operation of the particular elevating work platform. Operators must receive upgrade training when any of the following circumstances arise:

  • New equipment is introduced in the workplace that is unfamiliar to the operator
  • The equipment is modified in a manner that affects its safe operation or load capacity
  • The operating conditions or the environment in which the operator works has changed
  • The operator has been involved in an incident relating to the equipment
  • Skill or knowledge deficiencies have been identified
  • The requirements of the applicable standards or the Regulation change

Retraining or upgrade training may be provided by a training agency, a qualified person working for the employer, or by some other qualified individual, depending on the individual learning needs of the operator at that time.

Ensuring compliance
Employers must adhere to the requirements specified in the standard that applies to the particular equipment they are using. Since the individual elements of the various standards differ in areas such as operator training, retraining, the proof of training provided, and the retention of records, this can present a challenge with respect to ensuring compliance on an ongoing basis.

To ensure compliance, employers are encouraged to review the training related elements of the various standards that apply to the elevating work platforms they use, and consider adopting the most stringent elements of the standards that apply to that type of equipment. For example, ensure that all operators possess a suitable proof of training document, and keep that document with them at all times while operating the equipment.

Employers have a duty under section 115(2)(e) of the Act to provide to their workers the information, instruction, training, and supervision necessary to ensure the health and safety of those workers in carrying out their work and to ensure the health and safety of other workers at the workplace.

Employers also have a duty under sections 3.23 and 3.24 of the Regulation to ensure that new workers are given health and safety orientation and training specific to that workplace. As defined in section 3.22, a new worker is any worker who is new to the workplace, returning to a workplace where the hazards have changed, affected by a change in the workplace hazards, or relocated to a new workplace if the hazards are different.

In addition, there must be compliance with the applicable mobile equipment requirements set out in Part 16 of the Regulation.



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Disclaimer: The Worker and Employer Services Division issues Guidelines to help with the application and interpretation of sections of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation and with divisions of the Workers Compensation Act that relate to health and safety. Guidelines are not intended to provide exclusive interpretations but to assist with compliance. The Workers' Compensation Board of B.C. ("WorkSafeBC") does not warrant the accuracy or the completeness of the online version of the Guidelines and neither WorkSafeBC nor its board of directors, employees or agents shall be liable to any persons for any loss or damage of any nature, whether arising out of negligence or otherwise, which may be occasioned as a result of the use of the online version of the Guidelines.